Number of candidates per country of origin

© September 2019 Paul Cooijmans

Introduction

This report lists the numbers of candidates from each of the various countries of origin reported by high-range I.Q. test candidates since the mid-1990s. A household remark: There are a few countries in this table that no longer exist, like "Serbia and Montenegro", "Yugoslavia", and "Netherlands Antilles". If you are reading this and think you are listed as being from one of those but prefer to be on record as originating from a currently extant country, let me know so that it can be altered in the database. Although technically one's country of origin may well be a no longer existing country, in some cases it may be better to specify which current country it concerns.

Number of candidates per country of origin

RankCountry n 
1United_States442
2Netherlands186
3Germany87
4Sweden80
5United_Kingdom65
6Finland54
7Canada46
8Belgium42
9France39
10Spain32
11India31
12Greece30
13Italy28
14Australia27
15Denmark22
16Korea_South22
17Brazil21
18China20
19Japan18
20Norway18
21Poland18
22Austria15
23Turkey15
24Mexico11
25South_Africa9
26Argentina8
27Bulgaria8
28Israel8
29Portugal8
30Switzerland8
31Romania7
32Yugoslavia7
33New_Zealand6
34Singapore6
35Slovenia6
36Bosnia_and_Herzegovina5
37Croatia5
38Hong_Kong5
39Philippines5
40Thailand5
41Malaysia4
42Russia4
43Chile3
44Cyprus3
45Czech_Republic3
46Hungary3
47Iran3
48Cuba2
49Luxembourg2
50Malta2
51Serbia2
52Slovakia2
53Bangladesh1
54Cambodia1
55Colombia1
56Dominican_Republic1
57Ecuador1
58Egypt1
59El_Salvador1
60Iceland1
61Ireland1
62Korea_North1
63Kyrgyzstan1
64Latvia1
65Lebanon1
66Lithuania1
67Micronesia1
68Netherlands_Antilles1
69Nigeria1
70Pakistan1
71Serbia_and_Montenegro1
72Tunisia1
73Venezuela1
74Zambia1
75Country unknown1296

N = 2826

rnumber of candidates per country × national average I.Q. per country as published by Lynn and Vanhanen: 0.23 (n = 74)

Conclusion

The low but significant correlation with national average I.Q.'s shows that high-range tests tend to draw somewhat more candidates from countries with higher average I.Q.'s. For a proper understanding one should realize that the population sizes of the countries have not been controlled for, so this correlation could be (partly) caused by the larger populations of the countries with higher average I.Q.'s.

In this context, one should also consider the highly significant yet tiny correlation of test scores with national average I.Q.'s as routinely reported in the statistical reports (median r = .05 over 73 tests with a total of approximately 2500 score-country pairs). So, candidates from high-I.Q. countries score only very, very slightly higher than candidates from low-I.Q. countries, but there are more of them. This pattern of correlations is compatible with the following two mechanisms occurring in combination:

  1. High-range tests draw candidates from a certain constant I.Q. range irrespective of their countries of origin; this mechanism would cause there to be more candidates from countries with higher average I.Q.'s, and would cause a zero correlation of test scores with national average I.Q.'s;
  2. High-range tests draw more candidates from countries with higher population sizes and/or better infrastructure and access to the tests; this mechanism would cause a positive correlation of test scores with national average I.Q.'s, and would also contribute to the positive correlation between participation per country and national average I.Q., because the countries with higher national I.Q.'s are somewhat more populous on the whole.